Diverse Clinicians Series: Making Therapy Easily Accessible to Diverse Populations with Dr. Holly Sawyer | POP 732

A photo of Dr. Holly Sawyer is captured. Dr. Holly Sawyer is a licensed therapist in Philadelphia. Dr. Holly Sawyer is featured on Practice of the Practice, a therapist podcast.

How can you learn from others while following your own path? What are some things to consider when working with diverse populations? Why is harm reduction so important?

In the third episode of the Diverse Clinicians Series, Joe Sanok speaks with Dr. Holly Sawyer making therapy easily accessible to diverse populations.

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An image of the Practice of the Practice podcast sponsor, BiOptimizers, is captured. BiOptimizers is a magnesium supplement for reducing stress and improving sleep.

 

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Meet Dr. Holly Sawyer

A photo of Dr. Holly Sawyer is captured. She is a licensed therapist in Philadelphia and the CEO and lead psychotherapist at her solo practice Life First Therapy and Therapy Loft Collective, an online group practice. Dr. Holly Sawyer is featured on the Practice of the Practice, a therapist podcast.

Dr. Holly Sawyer is a licensed therapist in Philadelphia. She is the CEO and lead psychotherapist at her solo practice Life First Therapy and Therapy Loft Collective, an online group practice. Dr. Holly is also an entrepreneur mindset coach, national mental health public speaker, and college professor!

She is the author of Get Your Mind Right, Get Your Money Right! The Mental Health Guide for Successful Entrepreneurs and It’s Time to Talk About Trauma. She has been featured on Philadelphia’s Fox News 29, Bustle, Popsugar, and more.

Visit Life First Therapy and Therapy Loft Collective.

Connect with her on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn.

Laugh with Dr. Holly on Instagram.

In this Podcast:

  • Making therapy accessible to all
  • Stay true to what it is and who it is that you want to serve
  • Working with diverse populations
  • Racial disparities in dealing with substance use disorders

Making therapy accessible to all

As soon as the pandemic hit everything went virtual in Dr. Sawyer’s solo practice. She however started noticing that there was a need for black and brown folks to really attend therapy, it was this realization that led to the launch of a fully online group practice.

The mission is, to allow people who are black brown, to come into this space and to be able to heal from home or in their car, wherever they can so that they don’t have to worry about the commuting. (Dr. Holly Sawyer)

Aside from being 100% online, and in an attempt to make therapy even more accessible, Dr. Sawyer’s group practice accepts several types of insurance.

Stay true to what it is and who it is that you want to serve

Since making all the changes and shifts in her practice, Dr. Sawyer has learned some important lessons when it comes to realizing who it is that she wants to be.

Carve out who you want to be as a clinician, entrepreneur, a business owner, and stick to that. You can look to others as far as the things that they’ve done, mistakes, and things like that, however, you don’t have to look at them as your prototype. (Dr. Holly Sawyer)

Learn from those who inspire you and those who have made mistakes that you can avoid by learning from, but do not copy them entirely.

Figure out what your core is and build your business around that while learning from those around you, but stick to your values and your mission as your guiding light.

Dr. Sawyer’s advice for black business owners and therapists:

Stay true to what it is and who it is that you want to serve and work from that space. (Dr. Holly Sawyer)

Working with diverse populations

If a white clinician has someone who wants to enter a clinical relationship with them, whether it’s staff or a client and they are non-white, Dr. Sawyer recommends that they be open to learning about the cultural differences and their way of thinking.

If you are ever in those positions, I think the best thing that you can always do is ask questions and come from a place of curiosity and not from a place of ‘knowing’. (Dr. Holly Sawyer)

Be open and be curious. Respectfully ask questions if you are not sure, and be open to listening to and providing the space for new experiences and perspectives in your practice.

Racial disparities in dealing with substance use disorders

Addiction and substance abuse disorders are not racist, they don’t discriminate, but medical doctors, therapists, and policymakers do. (Dr. Holly Sawyer)

Practice harm reduction for all people.

The addiction, race, or gender does not matter when it comes to providing and offering treatment to someone who is seeking recovery.

Useful Links mentioned in this episode:

Check out these additional resources:

Meet Joe Sanok

A photo of Joe Sanok is displayed. Joe, private practice consultant, offers helpful advice for group practice owners to grow their private practice. His therapist podcast, Practice of the Practice, offers this advice.

Joe Sanok helps counselors to create thriving practices that are the envy of other counselors. He has helped counselors to grow their businesses by 50-500% and is proud of all the private practice owners that are growing their income, influence, and impact on the world. Click here to explore consulting with Joe.

Thanks For Listening!

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Podcast Transcription

[JOE SANOK] This is the Practice of the Practice podcast with Joe Sanok, session number 732.I’m Joe Sanok, your host, and welcome to the Practice of the Practice podcast. I hope you are doing amazing today, that you’re going after big things, that you’re pushing yourself to change and switch things up and try things that are new. You never know where things are going to go. I am so excited to have Dr. Holly Sawyer on the show today. We’re catching up after not chatting for a little bit and not because we didn’t want to talk, but it just, we didn’t align before now in regards to our schedules. So I have Dr. Holly Sawyer back on the show. Holly is the CEO and a licensed psychotherapist at her solo practice Life First Therapy and online group practice, Therapy Loft Collective in Philadelphia. Dr. Holly is also an entrepreneur, mindset coach, national mental health public speaker and college professor. How does she do all of that? She’s been featured on Philadelphia’s Fox News 29, Bustle, Popsugar, and more. Holly, welcome to the Practice of the Practice podcast. [DR. HOLLY SAWYER] Hey Joe, glad to be back. How have you been? [JOE] Ah, man, you and I both said, when I said before we started rolling what’s new, you said what’s not new. I’m like, that sounds like my world too. A few things have changed in the last two years for me. Yes, I’m so glad that you’re back on the show. We were laughing and joking so much before we started recording. I’m like we got to stop because like we got to have this really show. So welcome back. I want to just start with you adjusted things through the pandemic and other things around your practice in regards to focus and online. Tell us about that shift. Then I want to hear a little bit about like why you made that shift and what motivated it. [DR. HOLLY] Sure. First of all, thank you for having me back. It’s always good to catch up with you. So I was doing face to face 100%, well about 80% because a lot of, some of my clients did travel for work. So when the pandemic hit, everything just went virtual as far as my solo practice. But then I noticed that there was a need for black and brown folks to really, really attend therapy because the pandemic was a little different for us, just shifting, trying to find our way in our balance. I said, how can I be a part of this effort? So what I did was I end up launching a 100% online group practice, hired some great therapists and that has been going extremely well.We work particularly with youth 14 and over all the way up to seniors. The mission is to allow people who are black and brown to come into this space and be able to heal from home or their car wherever they can so they don’t have to worry about the commuting. Now that gas prices are through the roof, getting gas for their car or daycare issues and things like that. So we just make it extremely accessible. Another thing that I did in this online group practice that I don’t do in my sole practice is that I opened it up to accept several types of insurances. So if you have insurance, the ones that we are in network, with that makes it even more accessible. We, of course, do it video, so it’s not telephone. That has been going exceptionally well. [JOE] When you were setting up the a hundred percent online practice what were some challenges that you faced in doing that? [DR. HOLLY] Believe it or not the number one and still a challenge is finding good staff because you know how you want your practice to be and the community that you’re trying to create on the staff side. We’ve never had an issue with people coming into therapy looking for therapists, but I have had some turnover when it comes to finding great therapists and I don’t think it’s anything against them per se. I know particularly what I’m looking for, what I would like to work with and create within Therapy Life Collective. That’s what it’s called. But on the flip side of that, or other side of that coin, we’re calling great resignation, so people are having a lot more options. So some people thought like, oh my gosh, are you crazy? Why would you open up a business during the pandemic and a great resignation? I didn’t let it stop me because I know that there are people who need these services and I’m not wrong about it, but definitely a challenges, securing and finding good talent. [JOE] In those unique communities that, I’m sure different communities have different ways of thinking through thing, what were some, either challenges or marketing or copywriting or ways that you communicated to the people that you wanted to serve? How did you have to communicate differently or get the word out, or was it just, there was such a need that as soon as you opened your doors or opened your screen, like you were getting full? Tell me about the marketing of it to those communities. [DR. HOLLY] Okay, I’ll say some mix of both. Being a therapist you already know, you want to definitely niche down, is what they say, find where that gap is. I knew during this pandemic that a lot of black and brown folks were tired. So they were at some point taking advantage of having that downtime working from home but as we’re now two years, almost three years into this thing, the mental health part of it started to really take a toll. So I didn’t really play to that because I understand that everybody went through the pandemic in their own type of way. So what I did realize and put out there as far as marketing is to say, listen, if you are suffering, you don’t have to suffer in silence.It was a lot of Instagram posts, it was a lot of me going onto podcasts like yours or joining other groups on my networks and just putting the word out there, like, “Hey, there’s a safe space. You don’t have to come into a place. You can meet with somebody confidentially from your home or wherever, as long as you have a connection and you can, I like to say heal from home.” So a lot of that marketing was, again, going on lives on Instagram, going live on Facebook and just really driving home that if you are suffering, you don’t have to stay strong because you’re black, you’re brown. You can really start going to therapy. It’s time. So I think, in 2021 we saw a huge uptick because I think at that point it just became very heavy mentally on top of everything going on with George Floyd and the race relations of the country. It was just a lot. I think at that point it was undeniable. If you needed to talk to a therapist about anything, whether it was work related, race related, social injustice, we just saw a huge uptick. [JOE] Yes, and in finding clinicians that can work at your practice you said that that’s been a challenge, what have you done to attract other people that, or are you at the point that you’re also hiring people to join your practice at this point? Or where are you at with that? I should start there. [DR. HOLLY] Great question. Thank you for asking. So I’ve done like what some employers do. I’ve been on ZipRecruiter. I’ve been on Indeed. When I first launched the ad on Indeed it got so crazy that I had to pause it because I had such an overwhelming response. Some people were, like Uber and Lyft drivers, they didn’t have the credentials, but then you actually had some people who were but they were just not a good cultural fit for, again, for what I’m building at TLC. So to this day, yes, we are hiring, but I’ve expanded to say that you don’t have to be licensed in Pennsylvania, but you do have to be licensed because what I will do is help you get licensed and credentialed in other states.So I’m set up to where I can see for my agency. My practice can see clients within 10 states. So if you’re not within those 10 states, but you’re licensed, let’s just say someone, I’m not in Michigan, but say someone who’s in Michigan or say, listen, I’m licensed, fully licensed, independently licensed and I’ll say, okay, no problem. If they’re a good fit, then I’ll help them get licensed in those other 10 states that I have clients in so that they could, again, continue to have their Michigan clients, no sweat. But then they’re also seeing those clients in those 10 states that I am licensed to work in and credentialed with. We’ll pay for that process. We have monthly staff meetings just to check in with each other. This is a very autonomy based position but at the same time I provide supervision and you get to control how many clients you want to see and who you get to work with. So this is not like community health where we’ll get a slew of intakes and then I just assign. No, you have the choice to choose clients who you really feel you can be your best with working with. I don’t want therapists to feel like they have to take on a particular client who may not be a good clinical fit. That’s not clinically sound or helpful. [JOE] What do you wish other black business owners and therapists would know or do, based on what you’ve learned from shifting your business, changing your business, all the important work that you’ve done? [DR. HOLLY] I think what I have learned throughout this whole process is that carve out who you want to be as a clinician, as an entrepreneur, as a business owner and stick to that. You can look to others as far as the things that they’ve done, as far as making mistakes and things like that, however, you don’t have to look at them as your prototype. So for me, I didn’t, I’ve had people around me that I’ve learned from, but I’ve always stayed in my lane. I’ve always carved out who I want it to be, to stand out for who I am, because all of us are unique. So my suggestion would to be stay true to what it is and who it is you want to serve and just really work from that space. [JOE] Okay, then when you think about white business owners, what would you want us to know in regards to working with diverse populations? I know we talked about not necessarily going too deep into race, but I mean, you are such an expert in this area I can’t not ask you this question. I’m thinking about Traverse City where I live. We are so white and so, so few therapists even think through how do they help diverse populations, but white people aren’t the only people here. We have a tribe up here, we have a lot of immigrants that come in the summertime and so it is a diverse area at different times of the year. What would you hope white therapists or even people in any position of privilege that they would think through when they’re setting up their practice? [DR. HOLLY] Wow, that’s a heavy question, but an important question. So I’ll say this, if you have someone who wants to enter a clinical relationship with you, whether it’s staff or a client and they are non-white I would suggest being open to learning about that person, learning about their culture and their way of thinking so it won’t put you in a position where you may seem culturally insensitive or not empathetic or not understanding. So if you ever nurse positions, I think the best thing that you can always do is to ask questions and come from a place of curiosity and not from a place of like knowing, because again we all can be culturally competent.So let’s approach people who doesn’t look like us in a very curious way, asking questions and just trying to build that rapport to make sure that we have a clear understanding. It boils down to really being, it really just boils down to being educated. Because a lot of times, if we’re in a place where we offend, it’s like, oh, I didn’t know, I didn’t know. And that’s really not a defense because we can ask questions from a place of curiosity that doesn’t offend so we can become aware and knowledgeable. So I think that’s my biggest thing, is just always being curious and asking questions so you can become educated and just coming from a place of not knowing. [JOE] Well, and when you say, I don’t know, I didn’t know, it’s like, well, if I’m driving over the speed limit and I’m just like, I didn’t know, like that’s not going to hold up in court. You have a responsibility to do your own work and do all that. [DR. HOLLY] Exactly. [JOE] So I know you’re partnering with NBCC and you’re doing some awesome trainings. I just want to know for one, what are the trainings, but then also, how do you land a gig like that? [DR. HOLLY] Okay, so for the past, I would say over six years, I have been conducting and diving deep into this particular research that impacts cocaine use disorder in blacks throughout the country. I have been struggling with getting rejected, not having a platform to really talk about this particular topic because the opioid epidemic has been overshadowing so much because it majority impacts white America. So last year, NBCC, National Board of Certified Counselors Foundation said, “Hey, we’re going to have a symposium in 2022. We’re going to do a face to face in DC. We’re accepting proposals.” So I said I’m going to just submit and I’m never giving up until someone gives me a yes. They told me, yes. So in a week, I’ll be going down to talk about the racial disparities as we keep diving into substance use disorder within a country as a whole. We are in an opioid crisis, however, people are dying continuously from other drugs. So I don’t want those persons to be missed or forgotten. [JOE] What are some of, since you’re doing this next week, it’s top of mind for you, what are some of the key things that you would want therapists to know about the disparities? [DR. HOLLY] That addiction, substance use disorder is not racist. It doesn’t discriminate, but medical doctors, therapists, policy makers do. When someone comes into your office, or you may have a law that’s presented in front of you, we have to practice harm reduction for all people. It doesn’t matter the addiction, it doesn’t matter the race, it doesn’t matter the gender. But we have to be in a position where we don’t discriminate. If we see something that needs to be fixed, because again, addiction and substance use disorder is not discriminatory, then we can’t take on the stance of saying no, because they’re not having a substance use disorder with one particular drug that they can’t get better treatment. [JOE] How are researchers addressing that problem or suggesting that we address that problem? What are policy changes or things that you’re recommending or other people are recommending? [DR. HOLLY] Very good question. So as of right now harm reduction is really, really big. So one of the ways that that is being addressed is to say like, hey, if we’re going to have needle exchange programs, what about having clean pipes for people who actually may be smoking crack cocaine? So we’re not just looking at people who may use drugs with a needle, but all different types of drug paraphernalia so that people can be safe because if they’re choosing to use drugs, then what does harm reduction look like for those persons and not just for opioids, but other person’s drug of choice. We’re also looking at how people can possibly test their pills, for example, to see if fentanyl is in inside those pills, because if fentanyl is in it, then that means they could possibly die because fentanyl is very deadly. Fentanyl is in everything, especially drugs that are bought off the street, that are handmade. So we have a very nice number of harm reductionists who are on Capitol Hill, who are addressing this and trying to work with policy and lawmakers to address harm reduction across all drugs and not again, just opiates. [JOE] Now I can picture some of the pushback on any of that harm reduction. I mean, this is an old argument, and I’m not saying I disagree with it, but I would love to hear your thoughts on it, so like, when people say, well, harm reduction, things like that, why should our tax dollars go into helping someone have clean needles or something? I know my own personal views. I don’t want people to die. I don’t want people to be hurt, but how do you answer that? Because I imagine you have a more, you’ve done this research, you’re an expert in this area, how do you push back on that argument when people say, why should my tax dollars go to help someone that’s doing drugs or something like that? [DR. HOLLY] That’s a very good question. I always try to, education is such a great tool. It really goes a long way because there’s so much mis-education being passed around. So for example there’s a neighborhood in Philadelphia call K, basically Kensington Avenue. So that actual, like for miles is an avenue that you can drive down and you can see a lot of people who are living in tents, who have substance use disorder, to opiates. You can be at a light and someone will literally stand in front of you, not on purpose, but because this is where they are and inject heroin in their arm. So there’s a park down in that area and it’s now named as Needle Park because when you walk through that park, it is flooded with needles.People in that community are very frustrated. They’re upset because they can’t take their children to their park. So this is an example of where your tax dollars can go to use to say, hey, if you live in a neighborhood that’s infested like this and you see that these people are sick and they need help, well, this is what harm reduction can be used for. This is what a safe injection site could be used for. I know I wouldn’t want my 10 or eight year old viewing someone openly out in the open using any drug, opiate, whatever it is. So again, harm reduction for some people when they’re not educated, they may say it’s a way for people to continue to use drug. Well, people are going to use, regardless whether we have harm reduction or not, but at least let’s get them off the street so we can take back our communities and make them safer again. [BiOptimizers] Did you know that there is one phase of sleep that almost everyone fails to get enough of? This one phase of sleep is responsible for most of your body’s daily rejuvenation, repair, controlling hunger, weight loss, and boosting energy. I’m talking about deep sleep. If you don’t get enough deep sleep, you’ll probably always struggle with cravings, slow metabolism, premature aging, and even worse conditions.A big reason why most people don’t get enough deep sleep is because of magnesium deficiency, which affects over 80% of the population. Magnesium increases GABA, which encourages relaxation on a cellular level, which is critical for sleep. It’s important to understand that most magnesium products out there are either synthetic or they have one or two forms of magnesium, which really the body needs all seven forms for the essential sleep mineral. That’s why I recommend a product my friends over at BiOptimizers created called Magnesium Breakthrough. Taking this magnesium before bed helps you relax and wake up refreshed and energized.I also love that BiOptimizers offers free shipping on select orders as well as a 365-day money-back guarantee on all their products. Plus they have a customer satisfaction rating of 99.3%. You can get 10% off Magnesium Breakthrough, the best aid that I know of for boosting deep sleep at magbreakthrough.com/practice. Again, that’s magbreakthrough.com/practice, and be sure to use [PRACTICE10] for 10% off. [JOE SANOK] Well, this next question is going to be quite the pendulum swing from all these heavy topics. So you started doing standup comedy. I started doing improv. Tell me, how’d you get into standup? [DR. HOLLY] I really don’t have like this huge major story. I’ll be honest. So I’m always cracking and making jokes anyway and so a couple people are like, yoh, you’re funny. I’m like, okay. I would say like during the pandemic I was on a friend’s podcast and she was like, you really should go at standup. I’m like, really? She was like, yep, I’m going to hold you accountable for it. I was like, okay. So in Philly we have a comedy club here called Helium and they actually have comedy classes and improv. So you have to take the comedy class first before you enter into improv and I was supposed to do it like last year, but of course the pandemic has been up and down so I decided to jump into it spring of this year, jumped into it, fell in love with it and now I’m just continuously writing jokes, I’m writing skits, because I would, at one point I would love to have like my own show. So it has been like, it’s been fun. I have eight other colleagues who we took the the class with and they continue to do standup between Philly and New York. So it’s been great to support them. It’s been really nice. [JOE] Oh it’s interesting because I think people think of improv and standup as being in the same genre, but I feel like standup is so, like you’re practicing it. You got your bit, you got your timing and it’s very, there’s like a formula to it. Not that there’s not an improv, but improv is so off the cuff that improv feels so easy for me whereas standup terrifies me. [DR. HOLLY] Aw. I’m glad you said that because I’m looking to tap my toe in an improv class and I’m like, I don’t know if I can come up with something just off the cuff like that because you’re right. Writing a standup bit is totally different than someone says, okay, do a skit or a improv off of an orange and an apple. You’re like, whoa. So I could imagine just looking at a prop and being stumped and trying to do an improv off of that. Wow. [JOE] So you’re glad I bring it. No I think we have some mutual affinity towards each other’s craft. What do you think that doing standup does for, not that it has to always tie into like business, but just for you personally how does it make you come alive? How is taking on a new challenge? What does it do for you personally? [DR. HOLLY] That’s a good question because whenever I do stand-up or write jokes, because I’m a therapist, people are like, you should talk about therapy and I’m like, no, because I do that for a living. I don’t want to take it with me on stage. What I do want to talk about is just my experiences, with being a wife, being a mom, sometimes being a therapist, but I never want that to be the focal point. I want to get up, I want to entertain the people who are there to see me, hopefully they laugh and if not, that’s okay too, because for me it’s my hobby. Like I didn’t get into arts and crafts and DIYs and other type stuff but this as my hobby has just been really good for me. I’m not a gym rat. Like I was just struggling during a pandemic to really find something that was fun and creative and I think for me stand up, definitely does that because I can just get up there for 3 to 5 min, literally 3, no more than 5 minutes and just talk my shit and then, oh, I’m sorry if I couldn’t curse. [JOE] No, you totally can. [DR. HOLLY] Oh, okay, so I can get up there, talk my shit and then be gone. I don’t even worry about trying to land a laugh. I really just want to get up there and do my material because I think I’m funny and from my teacher’s point of view, that’s really all what matters? So I don’t get in my head about it. [JOE] Well, and maybe that’s where it seems more difficult to me than improv because in improv that seems sort of like sometimes we fall flat on our face and we try to recover and it’s hilarious and people love the fall on your face as well. Maybe my paralyzed by perfection side, I just need to start doing some standup. There is a place that just reopened recently here that has stand up and one of our improv folks does it. [DR. HOLLY] Should try it. And let me just say this, here’s why I think you should try it. Comedy is so subjective. So I may find you funny, but the person next to me at the comedy club may not and it’s okay because it’s so subjective. That’s why I don’t get in my head about it because I know that I’m not going to be funny ever to some people and it’s okay. But there are people who are going to see my set, there are people who are going to see your improv, hopefully your standup and they are going to fall out. But I can’t do anything about the people that I’m not funny too. So [JOE] That’s a great point. I think I’ll just tell ridiculous stories about just stuff that’s happened to me. I’ve had some silly stuff happen, so maybe I’ll just start making a list. I do have a note on my phone called standup. That’s just stories that I think of that are like hilarious stories, like when I got locked in a bathroom in Paris and just other ridiculous things. So maybe I’ll just do that, a bunch of bathroom stories [DR. HOLLY] Yes, I like that seed. I like that seed. You should definitely turn it into a joke. [JOE] Yes, I mean it would be the second best set, the number two. [DR. HOLLY] Do it. [JOE] Awesome. Well, the last question Holly, that I always ask is if every private practitioner in the world were listening right now, what would you want them to know? [DR. HOLLY] I think what I said before, just find what your niche, your lane is and just kill it, like definitely kill it. Don’t look to the right of you. Don’t look to the left of you. Just look forward and whatever that is, just kill it. Be open to the path. Some days are going to be shitty. They’re going to suck, but it’s a part of your process. So embrace it, but just rock it out, whatever it is. [JOE] So awesome. If people want to connect with you, if they want to follow your work, learn from you, where’s the best place to send them. [DR. HOLLY] Sure. So if you want to follow all things therapy, you can look me up on Instagram at Life First Therapy, LLC. Now, if you want to laugh with me and come outside the therapy room, you can follow me also on Instagram at Dr. Hollys with an S, Funny Business, Dr. Holly, with an S, Funny. Business. [JOE] Love it. We will put links to that in the show notes as well. Holly, thank you so much for being on the Practice of the Practice podcast. [DR. HOLLY] Thank you for having me, Joe. [JOE] Yes, always a pleasure. [JOE] Sometimes coming alive is less about what we’re doing in our practices and more what we’re doing outside of our practices. Not to say that our businesses can’t fill us full of purpose and life and all of that but I think in the same way that if all of my identity was in being a father and my kids gave me all my joy that would be dysfunctional if that was the only thing that gave me joy. Same sort of thing if our businesses are the only thing that bring us joy. Holly and I chatted for a good third of the interview about comedy and for me, improv has been one of those things that has just helped me just roll with it when things happen. I’ve had some keynotes that the sound went out and was able to just make people laugh off of something.I don’t do it to be better at business, but it just gives me a different posture towards life, a different angle towards life. So I want to encourage you to maybe this summer, try something new, sign up for an improv class, go to a restaurant you don’t usually go to. Do something that just shakes it up a little bit and you might be surprised just what that does for you on a different level.Also we couldn’t do this show without our awesome sponsors. A lot of us aren’t getting great sleep and we aren’t getting deep enough sleep and that deep sleep is so important. Did you know that 80% of the population is deficient in magnesium? Honestly I’ve been so against having any sort of supplements or things like that on the show, but I did try the Magnesium Breakthrough and for me it’s been awesome. It’s helped me wake up more refreshed and energized. You can try that if you head on over to BiOptimizers. They have a 365-day money-back guarantee and 99.3% customer satisfaction. You can get 10% off over at magbreakthrough.com/practice and use [PRACTICE10] to get 10% off in free shipping.Thank you so much for letting me into your ears and into your brain. Have an amazing day. I’ll talk to you soon.Special thanks to the band Silence is Sexy for your intro music.This podcast is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. This is given with the understanding that neither the host, the producers, the publisher, or the guests are rendering legal, accounting, clinical, or other professional information. If you want a professional, you should find one.

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